The skeleton in my car

The skeleton in my car

  This is a re-post which saddened me to read since my son has moved and I am no longer able to attend this parish when I visit. I’ve also been wondering how this parish is faring in the current climate of the Church where traditionalism and orthodoxy are seen as clinging to the past :   One of the blessings I have when visiting my grandson, is attending Mass at a very traditional Polish Catholic parish near my son’s house. Attending there, takes me back to a time when I remember the Mass celebrated with such reverence you left with a sense of awe, a time before it was so heavily influenced by the cool, indifferent Protestant characteristics I know so well. I spent twenty years in every kind of Protestant church community you can think of..I...

Francesca

Francesca

      “It is most laudable in a married woman to be devout, but she must never forget that she is a housewife. And sometimes she must leave God at the altar to find Him in her housekeeping” Frances of Rome is the first Benedictine name I was given when I made my final oblation in 2010. I say first because, two years later, I was given a second name, Gertrude (after St Gertrude the Great). I now have two Benedictine names and the why of that is a story for another day..But, I’ll give you a clue. It involved a clash with modernism. From Vultus Christi: Married Life and Monastic Conversion   Saint Frances of Rome (1384-1440), more properly called by her own name, Francesca, is the patroness of Benedictine Oblates. The Church has us...

Another lesson: devout affections–fourth prayer

Another lesson: devout affections–fourth prayer

  “God never makes a mistake.” These were the words from a Carmelite friend that the Lord used to guide me today. I met her at Mass submerged in and pining over my own struggles, when she stopped me and asked if I’d heard that a mutual friend of ours, had died. I was caught off-guard and very surprised by the news. Just before Christmas this dear friend– a convert to the faith at the age of 80– had, on the request of her family, begun considering a move to the Midwest where they all reside. It was becoming too complicated to help her from afar in the aging process . She resisted for many reasons and until the last minute tried to find another affordable place to accommodate her and her precious pet cat. None could be found; so...

O Emmanuel

  “O Emmanuel, Rex et legifer noster, exspectatio gentium, et Salvator earum: veni ad salvandum nos Domine Deus noster.” The Great Antiphons. Gregorian chant notation from the Liber Usualis (1961), p. 342. Latin lyrics sung by the Cantarte Regensburg. “Emmanuel, our King and our Law-giver, Longing of the Gentiles, yea, and salvation thereof, come to save us, O Lord our God!”   “The exact origin of the O Antiphons is not known. Boethius (c. 480-524) made a slight reference to them, thereby suggesting their presence at that time. At the Benedictine abbey of Fleury (now Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire), these antiphons were recited by the abbot and other abbey leaders in descending rank, and then a gift was given to each member of the...

One model, Christ

One model, Christ

  What we need are men like St Benedict   That’s not my Pollyannish peace perspective, naive about the war on civil society right at our doorsteps, rather it’s an acceptance of a stark reality: that there is no hope for us but God.   “Our hope is only in the Lord. All others will fail.” This is what Dante learned by the end of his journey through the afterlife. This is what we Christians must learn: not the family, not the church, not the state, nothing but God, who is Love. —Rod Dreher   How can Benedict help us? At the tender age of 19 or 20, St Gregory tells us Benedict was yet old enough to be deeply affected by the licentious and dissolute lives he witnessed as a student in Rome but, from his passion to be with God...